Aire - WinXP WiFi discovery software

Aire - WinXP WiFi discovery software

Postby GovCon » Thu Jun 03, 2004 1:11 pm

Cordially announce: AIRE is an 802.11 network discovery utility for Microsoft Windows XP (it works great on my main pc but not on the laptop for some reason with a Linksys WUSB11 v2.6)
It reads out the SSID channel and signal strength in a crap but useful computer generated voice.
Its got a signal level display as well as a few bugs like announcing that i was using channel 2000 and something :rolleyes: (comes in Spanish too)

http://www.astalavista.com/index.php?section=dir&cmd=file&id=1706
http://www.robota.net/article?id=1024

Please feel free to post your results and compatability reports.
For long you live and high you fly,
For smiles you’ll give and tears you’ll cry.
And all you touch and all you see,
Is all your life will ever be.
User avatar
GovCon
 
Posts: 67
Joined: Sun May 30, 2004 3:07 pm
Location: Eire

Postby GovCon » Mon Aug 09, 2004 5:50 pm

Having recently gotten 2 new cards I have experimented with this a bit more.
It works with my Sitecom Wireless Network card 11M (WL-011v2) and my Intel Pro/Wireless 2011B LAN PC card (WPC2011BWW)
You can open more than one instance of the program at a time and therefore use 2 different cards at the same time.
Ive figured out the bug when it’s reading out the network channel too, its reading out the frequency, 245700. Another slight disadvantage of using this program is that it does not automatically store the networks it’s found in a log file.
It’s quite Netstumbler-esque so if you’re having problems getting your card to work with Netstumbler this is a definite alternative.
For long you live and high you fly,
For smiles you’ll give and tears you’ll cry.
And all you touch and all you see,
Is all your life will ever be.
User avatar
GovCon
 
Posts: 67
Joined: Sun May 30, 2004 3:07 pm
Location: Eire

Postby bigpappasmurf » Mon Aug 09, 2004 10:30 pm

This is pretty cool, but it crashes when it detects more than one network, by the way, i've only tryed it with my linksys 802.11 B/G card. I'll try it with the Avaya Orninoco clone later or tomorow.
bigpappasmurf
Mini Stumbler
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 2004 11:31 am

Postby Serviceman » Thu Aug 12, 2004 11:58 pm

Could anybody explain me how exactly relates RSSI with SNR and Signal+ as indicated in NetStumbler?
Serviceman
Mini Stumbler
 
Posts: 17
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 12:59 am

Postby Thorn » Fri Aug 13, 2004 4:17 am

Serviceman wrote:Could anybody explain me how exactly relates RSSI with SNR and Signal+ as indicated in NetStumbler?


RSSI: Received Signal Strength Indication (AKA "Signal")
SNR: Signal to Noise Ratio
Signal+: Highest recorded Signal on a particular AP

Don't confuse 'Signal', 'Noise' and 'SNR' with 'Signal+', 'Noise-' and 'SNR+'.

The columns without the signs are the current reading, with those marked with the signs (+ , -) are the maximum recorded for each AP .
Thorn
Stop the TSA now! Boycott the airlines.
Thorn
 
Posts: 10340
Joined: Sat Apr 13, 2002 3:00 am
Location: Villa Straylight

Postby Serviceman » Fri Aug 13, 2004 5:06 am

I understand what the terms mean, but I don't know the equation between RSSI and say SNR, if there is any.
Serviceman
Mini Stumbler
 
Posts: 17
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 12:59 am

Postby Thorn » Fri Aug 13, 2004 5:17 am

SNR is the difference between the Signal level and the Noise level.

Signal - Noise = SNR

Example:
Signal = -70dBm
Noise = -100dBm

-70 - -100 = 30

Therefore: SNR = 30dBm

Read through the Antenna FAQs, there is a fair amount of RF information in there.
Thorn
Stop the TSA now! Boycott the airlines.
Thorn
 
Posts: 10340
Joined: Sat Apr 13, 2002 3:00 am
Location: Villa Straylight

Postby Serviceman » Sun Aug 15, 2004 11:07 pm

Thorn wrote:SNR is the difference between the Signal level and the Noise level.


I know this terms pretty well, but what I don't know, how it mathematically relate with RSSI, if at all.
Serviceman
Mini Stumbler
 
Posts: 17
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 12:59 am

Postby wrzwaldo » Mon Aug 16, 2004 4:27 am

Serviceman wrote:I know this terms pretty well, but what I don't know, how it mathematically relate with RSSI, if at all.


Here you go.

[quote]
Because the RSSI detector is a nonlinear detector, it changes the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of the signal that goes into it. The key to the ASK sensitivity calculation is the SNRout vs SNRin curve of the RSSI detector.

Once we know the SNRout vs SNRin relationship, the steps to finding the ASK sensitivity for a given Noise Figure, IF Bandwidth, and Data Rate are given below.


1. Determine the Eb/No needed for a target BER (10-3 in this example) then calculate the SNR from the Eb/No by using

SNR = (Eb/No) * (R/BBW)

Where R is the data rate and BBW is the Data Filter bandwidth.
2. Reduce the SNR calculated from the previous step by the ratio in dB of the IF (pre-detection) BW to the Data Filter BW. For instance, a 600 kHz IF BW and 6 kHz Data Filter BW means a 20 dB reduction in the SNR. This is the SNR of the signal coming out of the RSSI detector before the Data Filter gets rid of the high frequency noise (assumed to occupy the IF BW). At sensitivity, this ratio is usually negative in dB.
3. Use the RSSI SNRout vs SNRin curve to find the SNR at the input to the RF or IF Amplifier and RSSI detector. You actually use the curve "backwards" to find SNRin given the SNRout you calculated in Step 2.
4. Use the SNR formula for the front end of a receiver to find the signal level at the receiver input. This is the sensitivity, S.

S = (SNRin) * (kTBIFFS)
Where kT is the noise spectral density at 290 K (-174 dBm/Hz) BIF is the IF (pre-detection) BW, and FS is the system (not just the front-end) noise figure of the receiver.

Because the RSSI detector is a logarithmic detector, the SNR input-output relationship can be expressed in a closed-form expression, albeit a messy one. An old paper published in the IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems[1] derived the expression and plotted the SNRout vs SNRin curve. The curve in the article is small and doesn
wrzwaldo
 
Posts: 8995
Joined: Sun Dec 14, 2003 12:43 pm

Postby Serviceman » Tue Aug 17, 2004 2:03 am

Thanks!
Serviceman
Mini Stumbler
 
Posts: 17
Joined: Fri May 14, 2004 12:59 am

Spyware ?

Postby yoshiguy » Sat Aug 21, 2004 12:14 pm

anyone know if this program might have spy ware in it ?
yoshiguy
Mini Stumbler
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Jul 08, 2004 8:27 pm

Postby GovCon » Sat Aug 21, 2004 3:01 pm

Highly Unlikely. I’ve been using it for months and haven’t seen a sight of anything spyware like, a fully updated Ad-aware scan reveals nothing and even if it was spyware in any form it would be crap as its not starting itself on boot, and i look everywhere.

Any reason you are asking?
For long you live and high you fly,
For smiles you’ll give and tears you’ll cry.
And all you touch and all you see,
Is all your life will ever be.
User avatar
GovCon
 
Posts: 67
Joined: Sun May 30, 2004 3:07 pm
Location: Eire

Postby yoshiguy » Sun Aug 22, 2004 12:00 pm

I ask because it's not an open source product and I just want to sure. I had problems before with spyware.

How is the program? Can you do packet capture ?
yoshiguy
Mini Stumbler
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Jul 08, 2004 8:27 pm

Postby GovCon » Sun Aug 22, 2004 7:02 pm

1) Netstumbler is not open source how do you know its not spyware?
2) The world has had problems with spyware before, get ad-aware or spybot search and destroy and use your common sense!
It does not do packet capture, it is very similar to netstumbler in features.
For long you live and high you fly,
For smiles you’ll give and tears you’ll cry.
And all you touch and all you see,
Is all your life will ever be.
User avatar
GovCon
 
Posts: 67
Joined: Sun May 30, 2004 3:07 pm
Location: Eire

Postby yoshiguy » Tue Aug 24, 2004 7:19 pm

You have a point but netstumbler is such a popular program. If there was, someone would have notice by now.
Aire is still new.
yoshiguy
Mini Stumbler
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Jul 08, 2004 8:27 pm

Next

Return to Windows

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests